Category: Business

CFT Announces First Hughes Award Winner

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Jack Kinnebrew (center) celebrates his award with Monica Egert Smith and Dave Scullin (Courtesy Communities Foundation of Texas)

Communities Foundation of Texas (CFT) announced that Jack M. Kinnebrew of Strasburger & Price, LLP has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the first Vester Hughes Award, which was established to honor individuals who most embody the spirit of the late, respected tax lawyer, Vester T. Hughes, Jr.

CFT works with families, companies, and nonprofits to strengthen the community through a variety of charitable funds and strategic grant making initiatives.


Rundown Revival

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Dallas Equestrian Center upgrades are attracting new trainers and users. (Courtesy of Dallas Equestrian Center)

After changing owners in 2015 and undergoing extensive renovations last year, the Dallas Equestrian Center (DEC) is making a new name for itself as a top horse facility in North Texas.

The most significant improvement is a 50,000-square-foot GeoTEX outdoor arena surrounded by new fencing and footing to better accommodate horses.

Other highlights include a European horse-walker, 20 new covered paddocks, and some general maintenance improvements to the barn intended to make DEC a premier facility. A new clubhouse with locker rooms and coaches’ offices is also in the works, according to co-owner Scott Wilson.


It’s Been a Magic Carpet Ride

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Rejebian & Son is set to close in June. (Courtesy Rejebian & Son)

After 84 years of business, Rejebian & Son Oriental Rugs will close its doors in June.

“All things at some point come to an end,” said third-generation rug man David Rejebian. He has run the family business since the 1970s, but after working six-day weeks for the past 40 years, he’s ready to do something different.

His plans include playing with his bird dogs and golfing. David married later in life and does not have any children to take over the store. He is not interested in selling the business name, but will continue to share his rug expertise as an appraiser and consultant, adding that he will always enjoy talking about rugs.


New in the Neighborhood

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From left: Try the chef’s vegan creation, Special K salad, and avocado toast. (Photos: Robin D. Everson)

Restaurateurs Tracy Rathbun and Lynae Fearing, known for their restaurant Shinsei, recently opened Lovers Seafood and Market in the space formerly occupied by Rex’s Seafood.

Greg O’Neal of Philosophy Design took 3,000 square feet and created an intimate space that seats 79. It has a calming, open air feeling with hemp ropes, herringbone millwork, shiplap lumber walls, wood stain patina, and retrofitted crystal liquor decanters that provide enchanted lighting. The outdoor patio accommodates and an additional 40.

After leading Boot Ranch’s kitchen in Fredericksburg, former Abacus chef Aaron Staudenmaier has returned to Dallas. He created a menu that is pleasing not just for the traditional seafood lover, but also for the diner that enjoys whole food, plant-based, vegan fare.


New in the Neighborhood

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Cinco Taco Bar with a rock 'n' roll vibe aims to capitalize on the U.S. taco obsession. (Courtesy photo Cinco Taco Bar)

Cinco Taco Bar is the latest restaurant to open in Preston Hollow Village and the newest addition to Cinco Tacos Cocina & Tequila of Addison.

Owned and managed by Mario Letayf, Chef Antonio Marquez, and a group of investors, the fast-casual taco establishment offers tacos, enchiladas, and a couple of salads.

The place has a subtle rock ’n’ roll vibe that is happy and family friendly.


Buckner Breaks Ground on Ventana Retirement Towers

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Buckner Senior Living is building the $136 million Ventana continuing care retirement living towers on 3 acres near NorthPark Center and University Park. (Courtesy Buckner International)

Buckner Senior Living broke ground April 20 on its $136 million Ventana continuing care retirement living towers, which will go up on 3 acres near NorthPark Center and University Park.

Ventana is Spanish for "window." The two residential towers at North Central Expressway and Northwest Highway will offer floor-to-ceiling windows with sweeping views of the downtown Dallas skyline and the Park Cities.

The development will include 189 independent living units, 38 assisted living units, 26 specialized memory care suites, 48 skilled nursing units, and 24 rehabilitation units, according to a news release.


Dallas Academy Opens Second Location

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Dallas Academy of Music and Performing Arts seeks to nurture talented performers. (Photo: Kelsey Kruzich)

The Dallas Academy of Music and Performing Arts (DAMPA) has opened a second studio around the corner from its original location on Milton Avenue.

DAMPA’s new Snider Plaza premises house multiple classrooms for music and performance courses.

“More space means we can do more awesome things,” owner Lisa Jenkins said. “Since the opening of Studio B, we have introduced some amazing courses.”


Flea Style: Makers, Shakers (and Shoppers)

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(Photo courtesy The Y Group)

Highland Park resident and Flea Style owner Brittany Cobb has a hard time deciding what her latest favorite find is.

Recently she’s narrowed it down to a pair of 1960s amber stained-glass light fixtures from an old church and a royal blue Oriental jacket worn and sold by a bride who purchased it while honeymooning in China.

Cobb said she loves that kind of shopping — finding unique items that often have a story.


Bluffview Growler Brings Craft Beer Close to Home

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Interior decoration of Bluffview Growler. (Photo: Joshua Baethge)

Craft beer lovers had reason to celebrate this January when the Bluffview Growler opened on Northwest Highway just east of Lemmon Avenue. The bar features a rotating lineup of craft beers with an emphasis on local brews.

“Every week gets a little busier,” co-owner Dale Czech said. Nearly four years after opening Lakewood Growler in East Dallas, he and his wife, Stacy, decided to bring their concept to Bluffview.

“I’ve always been kind of a serial entrepreneur. Back in 2013, I was home brewing and kind of knew what was going to happen with the local brew scene,” Dale said. “I figured I couldn’t brew and compete with what was out there, so I decided to sell other people’s beer.”