Category: Living Well

Love Yourself

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As we celebrate the month of romantic love, it’s also the perfect time to celebrate and love ourselves: take time to do what makes us happiest and brings us joy. do what takes away the pressures of our work lives, our social lives, our family, and other obligations that keep us from giving back to ourselves fully; and do what gives us balance.

I’m a firm believer that balance is so important and should be a priority for our mental and physical well-being. Many years ago I gave the key note speech at the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Luncheon, which this year will take place Feb. 3. During that speech I talked about how we, as women, give all of ourselves to our loved ones but if we don’t stop and take the time to take care of ourselves, we can’t take care of others. I was speaking about heart health, but it also rings true for “whole self” preservation.


Veg Out in Trinity Groves

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Finally, Dallas, FINALLY! We got one. Our very own casual, yet finer-dining, plant-based restaurant. I’ve had the opportunity to enjoy similarly innovative veg spots and have been awaiting the day one would pop up in my home base.

Ta-da! Executive Chef Troy Gardner gives us V-Eats Modern Vegan, which opened in Trinity Groves last fall. Troy has dipped his culinary skills into the veg pool at his other spots, such as Samson’s Gourmet, but this is his first fully plantbased restaurant. What does that mean? It means no animal products whatsoever — no dairy, meat, animal stocks, fish, or derivatives of any of those things. Instead, the kitchen makes in-house plant proteins, creams, and cheeses that are top of class.

You can find Salisbury steak, smoked artichoke and sausage pizza, beautiful and delicious nutrient-dense salads, chicken fried steak, mac and cheese, a brisket sandwich, gelato, and cheese cake on the menu.


Cut the Cord

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February. A cold, short little month with the Super Bowl, Valentine’s, and finally, the all-important Oscars. We coccoon around the TV and huddle up. I’ve scaled back on the Tube, since I want a clear line of demarcation between politics, news, and entertainment. Now it’s all just infotainment. How irksome when the talking heads become the news rather than report or spin it. Do I really need to know about Megyn Kelly and her 15 million dollars per annum for changing channels?

So I’ve switched off TV and gone to the movies. A lot “with buzz” come out right before the Oscars, although Jeff Bridges in Hell or High Water still gets my vote. I do enjoy the Academy Awards’ spectacle and joining in the national sport of betting on who’s going to win what while critiquing all those designer clothes and cutting-edge hairdos. It’s just fun and fantasy right? Scifi, romances, shoot-em-ups, even musicals are back. And billions tune in. Billions. So very much more than any other spectacle, except maybe the Olympics and the Super Bowl.

We project all kinds of feelings about those folks who resonate with us on the big screen. And it’s big, big bucks. I’m getting old, I guess, since there is a sameness about so many films with prequels and sequels, and I abjure the heavy-handedness of the gospel according to whatever agenda for political correctness Hollyweird is cramming down our unpolitically correct brains until we “get it.”


From Sports Injury to Med School

Former Green Bay Packers offensive tackle Dr. John Michels works at Interventional Spine and Pain in Preston Center, where he helps other athletes avoid sports injuries. (Photo courtesy Dr. John Michels) 0
Former Green Bay Packers offensive tackle Dr. John Michels works at Interventional Spine and Pain in Preston Center, where he helps other athletes avoid sports injuries. (Photo courtesy Dr. John Michels)

In 1998, Green Bay Packers offensive tackle John Michels tore his anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments, leading to six reconstructive knee surgeries and the end of his NFL career.

Nearly 20 years later, Michels’ career still involves sports. But instead of a field, he goes to work in an office in Preston Center, where he helps prevent other athletes from suffering the same fate.

Today, Dr. John Michels, who went to medical school at the University of Southern California after his injury, works at Interventional Spine and Pain, treating patients with tendonitis, sprains, and other conditions often caused by repetitive sports.


Dual Dallas Adventures

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Winter officially runs Dec. 21 through March 20. It remains to be seen if we will get winter weather but we Texans generally bundle up when it gets below 70 degrees. So, inclement weather or no, I’d like to share a couple ideas for venturing around Dallas where you only have to park once and don’t have to walk in the elements for more than a block.

Let’s start with dinner and a movie. One of Dallas’s best movie theaters is the Texas Theatre. If you haven’t been, it’s a Dallas must. This cool Oak Cliff theater is where Lee Harvey Oswald was captured. It has been restored with a neat little lobby bar and excellent projection and sound systems.

Screening current releases and revivals on both digital and actual film prints, the place is run by a group of film-fanatic friends. There are often theme nights with live music, DJs, or even craft activities to match whatever film is screening.


Indulge in December, Detox in January

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When the holidays are over, it’s time to refocus, renew, and rejuvenate…and detox.

Detoxing isn’t only for our bodies, full from the gluttonous yumminess we didn’t say no to (I mean the holidays are meant for indulging and enjoying, am I right?).

The post-holiday season is also a great time for some beauty detox. While we are laser-focused on ridding our bodies of the libations and treats, we should also concentrate on our largest organ — our skin, which is affected by everything we eat. Here are a few products that can help you retain that healthy glow and start the new year fresh-faced.


Get Going at the Ballet Burn

Margot Martin opened Ballet Burn on Sept. 10. (Photo by Kelsey Kruzich) 0
Margot Martin opened Ballet Burn on Sept. 10. (Photo by Kelsey Kruzich)

The Park Cities’ new fitness studio, The Ballet Burn, is not like your average barre workout.

Here, groups of women with limited dance backgrounds learn to dance and pose in eclectic styles, barre-free, in socks or bare feet to the tunes of the Notorious B.I.G., Outkast, or the Pointer Sisters.

Classes are taught by instructors with professional and collegiate ballet backgrounds, many of whom still dance. Clients build strength and coordination over time through a unique combination of ballet, yoga, and physical therapy. The studio also offers lessons in ballet technique and restorative yoga classes, as well as private lessons.

The mastermind behind the concept is Margot Martin, an Ursuline Academy alum and retired professional ballerina who turned to yoga after a career-changing injury.


Center for BrainHealth Honors Rep. Dan Branch

The Branch Family: Terrell, Spencer, Stacey, and Dan Branch (seated), and Daniel Jr., Heather, Catherine, Sarah, and  Charles Branch (standing). (Photos by Kristina Bowman and Melissa Macatee) 0
The Branch Family: Terrell, Spencer, Stacey, and Dan Branch (seated), and Daniel Jr., Heather, Catherine, Sarah, and Charles Branch (standing). (Photos by Kristina Bowman and Melissa Macatee)

The Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas presented Rep. Dan Branch with its highest honor at the Legacy Award Dinner, held at the Dallas Country Club Nov. 14.

Robin and Eric Bennett chaired the event, with Patty and James Huffines as honorary chairs.

The Legacy Award is given to individuals whose vision and dedication enables the center and its Brain Performance Institute to empower people of all ages to unlock their brain potential.


Dog Days of the Holiday

Photo courtesy of thinkstock.com 0
Photo courtesy of thinkstock.com

With the holiday season in full swing, it’s important to keep family pets safe and out of the vet’s office.

Jeanna Montgomery, a veterinarian at Preston Center Animal Clinic, weighed in on the dos and don’ts of the holiday season when it comes to keeping pets safe.

Montgomery’s biggest concern is feeding dogs table food, especially fats or bones from meat. This is the most common reason a dog comes to her clinic.

“The number one thing that usually happens is people want to give them a treat so they give them a fatty food when they normally don’t have fatty foods,” Montgomery said.