When You Mess With Bradford Pear Trees, You Mess With Bradford Pearson

My dad is ornamental horticulturist by trade, but it wasn’t until I was probably in my early twenties that I put together that I might have been named after a pear tree. I’m sure he’ll deny it, but subconsciously Bradford was probably a better choice for a Pear-son than D’Anjou or Bartlett. It’s a bit easier to explain to folks.

With that in mind, here’s an item that will be in this Friday’s police blotter:

At 4:05 p.m., a resident of the 4300 block of Beverly Drive reported that $5,000 worth of damage was done to seven trees in her backyard. When she returned from a business trip March 4, she saw Youpon holly and Bradford pear branches in front of her neighbor’s house. When she entered her own backyard, she saw that branches that extended over from her yard to her neighbors’ yard had been cut. The victim is not on speaking terms with her neighbor, following an incident when the neighbor’s contractor used an electrical outlet on the victim’s property to power tools during the neighbor’s remodel.

Just because I didn’t use your name doesn’t mean I don’t know who you are, neighbor of the resident of the 4300 block of Beverly Drive. And you just clipped the wrong trees.

9 thoughts on “When You Mess With Bradford Pear Trees, You Mess With Bradford Pearson

  • March 13, 2012 at 1:00 pm
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    In most municipalities, neighbors have the right to trim trees that extend onto/over their property.

    From FindLaw website – By law, you have the right to trim branches and limbs that extend past the property line. However, the law only allows tree trimming and tree cutting up to the property line. You may not go onto the neighbor’s property or destroy the tree. If you do harm the tree, you could be found liable for up to three times the value of the tree. Most trees have a replacement value of between $500 and $2500. Some, that are considered ornamental or landmark trees, can have an astonishing value of between $20,000 and $60,000. So use extreme caution when tree trimming!

    While it’s unfortunate these 2 neighbors couldn’t come to an amicable agreement on this, it’s doubtful any laws were broken.

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  • March 13, 2012 at 1:17 pm
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    MGBH Star- Part of the report I failed to mention: the victim believes the tree-cutter came onto her property to trim the branches.

    Tough to prove, but valid.

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  • March 13, 2012 at 1:31 pm
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    I grew up on the 4500 block of north versailles and lived there for 50 years and all those years i lived there I had a bunch of hateful mean neighbors.

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  • March 13, 2012 at 4:58 pm
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    If the tree trimmer came on her property, then it is the tree trimming company that would be at fault, not the neighbor. I have always wondered what the laws are regarding this type of situation. I have heard bits and pieces of stuff over the years about where the trunk is located; where the property line is; where the root system is located, what percentage of the root system is on your property, etc. Would be good to know the specifics as relating to HP/UP and I have no idea where to look.

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  • March 13, 2012 at 7:16 pm
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    Bradford- I had just noticed that about your name about a week ago and was going to email you to ask about it and see if you would make a public comment. Good timing! Thanks for the backstory/ back fable. BTW- is there any way to email you guys directly or do we just use the web form?

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  • March 13, 2012 at 7:21 pm
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    RD- bradford dot pearson at peoplenewspapers dot com. Thanks for reading.

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  • March 13, 2012 at 11:19 pm
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    White people problems.

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  • March 14, 2012 at 8:56 am
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    @Bradford – yeah, that’s an important fact to leave out.

    Given the HP Town Council’s normal disregard for trees, i.e. allowing homeowners to strip a lot of 100+ year old trees to build their 10,000+ sq. ft. “dream home”, I doubt any significant penalties would ensue other than maybe a trespassing citation to the tree trimmers if they did, in fact, enter the accuser’s property.

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